Ready to Publish Award

SETC and Stage Rights present a unique opportunity for playwrights! Established in 2016, the Ready to Publish Award is a program dedicated to developing, publishing, and licensing new works by members of the SETC community.

Now Accepting 2019 Submissions

Open Submissions: Oct. 16 – Nov. 20, 2018
Download 2019 Submission Policies + Play Submission Form

We are seeking completed full-length pieces that are either unproduced or have had one world premiere production or produced staged reading suitable for professional, educational and amateur venues.

The awards process is open to all, and there is no submission fee. The author of the winning piece must attend the 2019 SETC Convention in Knoxville, TN (with convention registration waived). Submissions should be sent to april@setc.org as outlined in the  2019 Submission Policies.

One Winner Will Receive:

  • Publication of the winning play in the Stage Rights catalog of plays and musicals
  • A panel reading of the play at SETC 2019, hosted by members of the SETC Playwriting committee
  • Prominent display of the final published play by Stage Rights at SETC 2020
  • 2019 SETC Convention Registration
  • $400 Royalty Advance

2018 Ready to Publish Award Winner

Anthropology Lesson

by J. Harvey Stone

J. Harvey Stone is a career teacher having taught students from preK- adult learners in subjects from Shakespeare to swimming, and Plutarch to pedagogy. In addition to his teaching public school for almost 20 years, Harvey has taught at the University of Richmond, Christopher Newport University, and the Center for Teacher Leadership at Virginia Commonwealth University. He is proud to be the Theatre Arts teacher and drama director at Jamestown High School in Williamsburg, VA. In 2018 Harvey’s cast of Jamestown students was selected by the Virginia Theatre Association to perform his original one-act play Immersed at the Southeastern Theatre Conference Convention in Mobile, AL.  Harvey’s current writing interests include the power of place, Southern characters and Appalachia, and he maintains an interest in writing for ensembles.

Synopsis: Anthropology Lesson explores the summer of ’69 in the lives of “roommates” Thomas and Douglas who live together in Grundy, Virginia. Thomas works as an above ground parts clerk at a West Virginia coalmine, and Douglas has the “summer off,” but is devoted to his job as an English teachers. Thomas and Douglas spent the last 13 years building a life together and truly live together as partners. An unexpected late night visitor interrupts Douglas’ first night home after an interesting weekend away. Can Thomas and Douglas continue to enjoy their lives together? What does the community really think about these “peculiar” men? What happens when there is more than one version of the truth?

Previous Winners

2018: Anthropology Lesson by J. Harvey Stone
2016: Independence Day at Happy Meadows by Laura King

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